Anniversary jumper

Hoo boy this one is another one that was a long time coming!

This knit started with the yarn. I wanted an affordable, thinner than 8 ply yarn, in nice colours. I can’t tell you much more about what started me wanting that because I bought this yarn almost three years ago! It’s Charlemont from valley yarns. I bought two hanks of Burgundy and three of Evergreen. The yarn is merino/silk/poly. The silk gives it a luscious sheen, and the colour is totally gorgeous (very hard to get an accurate photo of though it’s much less orange than it looks in these photos). But there’s enough poly in it to make it feel a bit odd to knit with, which definitely contributed to how long this knit took me. It’s also very fine – I mean OBVIOUSLY, it’s a fingering weight/4ply. The site calls it sock/fingering weight but it’s definitely fingering.

Because it was so fine I couldn’t get gauge for any of the patterns I liked. And anyway, I wanted something very plain and simple – they aren’t very exciting to knit but they’re the kind of garment I reach for over and over, and miss when I don’t have them in my wardrobe. I think I was swatching at craft camp and someone (Suse maybe?) suggested I try CustomFit. So I did! There wasn’t a design that was exactly what I wanted but the design it yourself bit was so easy. The design notes on this one are:

  • Hourglass close fit
  • Hourglass silhouette
  • Style: pullover
  • Length: High-hip length [which I then cropped]
  • Sleeves: Full-length sleeve
  • Neck style: Crew neck
  • The pattern called for 1×1 ribbing but I made it 2×2 because that retains its shape better

There’s no option for a cropped jumper, which I knew I wanted, so I just found where the waist would be and knit from there up. Essentially I took 4″ off the length. Details are on my ravelry page.

I really loved using  Custom Fit! I always have to add in bust darts and sometimes back shaping – generally I use the method in the Knit to Flatter book (by Amy Herzog who also runs Custom Fit). But honestly it was real nice to not have to do the maths myself. I am perfectly capable of designing this jumper my own self, but really it was worth $10 or so to not have to. Absolutely worth it.

I think I might need to start adding shaping for my upper back though

I did hit a major snag when I finished it and basted it all together. The sleeve caps were just laughably too short. Just not even close. I emailed the Custom Fit support and Amy was incredibly helpful. The measurements I’d put in were outside of what the algorithm could cope with, so she recalculated the sleeve caps for me! This involved some very nifty shaping and I am very impressed, both with her understanding of knit shapes, and the customer service. To be frank, I was a very irritating customer – I wrote long waffly emails, and then took months to reply back with crucial details like measurements. Amy was just wonderful throughout the whole process. I would recommend the Custom Fit service on this alone, PLUS the shaping  in the jumper is exactly perfect.

The remaining major flaw is my own fault. As I said, I cropped this jumper, because I wanted it to wear over dresses. However, it’s… short. I think really I should have another inch on it, although it does sit nicely over dresses – which was the intention. So I guess it’s a win – except that I don’t really have any dresses at the moment that this would sit nicely over! The ones I had in mind when I designed it have been retired due to wear or poor fit. Plus I really should have designed it with a Vneck to be useful over shirtdresses. I considered ripping back and redoing the neck – it’s not a hard adjustment to make – but this is the total amount of yarn I have left:

FullSizeRender (1).jpg

So yeah, I’m not risking it! This is the result of some serious yarn chicken on the sleeves. I initially measured them too short because I measured a bought jumper where the sleeves were exactly 2″ too long, but I neglected to notice that the shoulder of said jumper hung off my shoulder by 2″! And so I had to knit them another 2″ longer than the pattern called for – which turned out to be a good thing because I knit the sleeves at a particularly stressful time and my gauge was noticeably tighter, and the sleeves were too narrow! So with all of that, I’ve knit those dang sleeve caps maybe five times? I had to rip back and weight each sleeve and work out how much yarn each row took in order to get sleeves that matched and were long enough. Yeesh! I did a lot of that on our recent trip to Broken Hill, while listening to the latest arc of The Adventure Zone (it’s the BEST you guys), so now every time I look at this jumper I think of those things, which is really nice.

So as you can see, the jumper isn’t quite right for any of my dresses, and it’s also not right for skirts! The pattern as written/generated, an extra 4″ longer, would probably be perfect.

Nope!

So I have enough of the green yarn to knit the pattern in its original form, and the colour would be more versatile in my wardrobe than this one. But honestly I’m not sure if I’m up for it! This has been on the needles for almost two whole years – mostly sitting idle but even when it was actively being knit on it took forever. That said… I really really like it. The shape is exactly what I had in mind. User error aside, I’m so incredibly impressed by how this turned out. I would 100% recommend the Custom Fit platform and I’ll definitely be using it again. And maybe I’ll even be knitting this pattern again… once I’ve had some time to get over the dramas!

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Chuck sweater

You guys, I finished a knit!

This is Chuck by Andi Satterlund. I’ve seen Andi’s knits a lot on the blogosphere, and admired them, but I’d never bit the bullet on starting one because they are mostly in 10ply which is kind of hard to get here in Aus and also, I don’t honestly have that much call for 10ply jumpers. Until recently, that is! When we moved offices and the new office is basically refridgerated year round. In winter I end up wearing my outdoors jacket to sit at my desk sometimes, so I figured a 10ply jumper might be useful after all.

The yarn is from my stash. I had some leftover Cascade 220 from knitting a Rogue hoodie many years ago. I don’t actually have a single proper picture of that jumper because I never really wore it. The sleeves were about an inch too short, as was the body. It looked ok-ish but I never felt comfortable in it. In December 2014 I pulled it out to see if I could re-knit the sleeves, to find it had been moth eaten in some… significant spots. Nipple holes aren’t really the kind of thing I look for in a jumper, ya know? So I frogged the whole dang thing, planning to reknit it from scratch. A few months of slow progress in, however, I realised I just wasn’t that keen on it any more. I liked the idea of it but a knit hoodie doesn’t really fit in my life or wardrobe anymore. So I frogged it and skeined the yarn up and put it all back in the stash.

Obligatory cat pic

Then in winter last year I got the itch to knit again, and I was cross with the other thing I was knitting, which is quite fine yarn. I remembered Roisin’s version(s) and decided I’d give it a go! The yarn was sitting unused and unloved already, so if I didn’t love it I hadn’t lost much, and I was dying for the feel of chunky, wooly yarn in my hands.

Me, explaining it’s many hours yet until dinner time

Friends, I HATED knitting this sweater. I found the pattern really hard to navigate – I don’t know what it is but just something about how it was laid out made it hard for me to see what was happening as I read it. I had thought maybe I was exaggerating this in my head but as I was re-reading it to check my ravelry notes were up to date I got so frustrated trying to work out what the heck was going on that I accidentally tore a page in half as I was flipping it back and forth. Oops.

I made a bunch of adjustments. The details are on my ravelry page but the broad overview is:

  • Went down a needle size for the ribbing
  • Knit size L for shoulders and increased to the 1X size at the bust.
  • Added bust dart increases
  • Moved the side decreases to the back, which is where I need the shaping
  • Chucked in a couple of short row sections at the back to make up for my swayback
  • Knit an extra repeat
  • Knit the sleeves before I finished knitting the body because I was pretty sure they’d change how it fit (they did)
  • Picked up the number of stitches for the L sleeves and then didn’t decrease at the end of the armhole, leaving me with enough stitches for the 1X sleeve
  • Made the sleeves full length (see rav notes for how)
Bust increases

I initially knit the two repeats in the pattern and was going to just knit the ribbing long but the cables hit in an odd place and made me look really foreshortened. I check the hive mind via instagram and everyone agreed that it looked no good. So I ripped the ribbing back and did another repeat. I was concerned this would leave me with either a too-long jumper, or not enough ribbing. In the end it worked out ok. I wish the ribbing were 1/2″ longer, for proportion, but it sits neatly on my waistband at this length so I’m happy with it.

To be honest with you, I would not recommend this pattern to anyone above the size M, or with boobs bigger than say a C cup. I knew going in that it was a risk, making a chunky knit in negative ease, because I just don’t think that knits like that play well with larger figures. I think the risk paid off but I wouldn’t knit this again. And also the bust darts were VERY necessary, even though from the armpit down I knit the size that should fit my bust. Even with the darts you can see it folding and pulling at the side of my bust and I suspect it will wear badly in that area. I also think the cable and the negative ease makes my bust look droopy and frumpy. Not enough to not wear it, but it’s not really ideal.

Also look at the weird shape of that sleevecap! It’s a nice round shape when flat so idk what pulling is making it do that. I think I should have knit a size 1X sleeve but there honestly wasn’t that much difference in terms of stitch count.

Yup that pulling is definitely coming from the sleeve. Ugh.

I also really REALLY hated the way the sleeves were done. You pick up stitches around the armhole and knit it down, using shortrows to shape the cap. You are instructed to pick up less than half of the stitches that would fill out the armhole, and that + short rows immediately after pickup meant that row was really loose for me. I did a better job with the second armhole but even so I had to go back and stitch it closed so it wasn’t all gapey and weird.

ugly join on the first sleeve
Second sleeve is better

I also couldn’t find a way to make the short rows work without showing the wrap. I tried several techniques and all of them worked for me in thinner yarn but in this bulk, with negative ease? Nope. You can really see it in the back short rows I did.

The back shortrows do make it bubble a bit if I stand a certain way, but they also mean it doesn’t pull up at the back waistband. I’m very pleased with how that worked out.

I used this technique for the bindoff, and I’m really happy with it. I think this will be my regular bindoff now.

I did like the way the top down construction helped me try it on and add adjustments on the fly. And I do like the finished product – more than I thought I would when I first finished it! But boy. It was rough going.

I actually knit it with my Malmaison skirt in mind but I’m not sure I love them together. The Cascade is ‘Aporto’ and it’s a dark blue with flecks of green in it. It reads as almost navy but next to a true navy is much more petrol-coloured. And I love to match… I’ll probably wear them together, but I like it more with the demin skirt.

So there we have it! A very ambivalent FO. But however mixed my feelings are towards the pattern itself, I am THRILLED to have finished a knit. I haven’t knit very much the last few years, due to wrist issues and also really struggling with mental health in winter, which is when I knit most, and not wanting to do anything at all. It feels so good to be back to knitting – it’s my very first craft, and what made me start this blog, through which I have met so many of you wonderful people. I hope the bug sticks!

Knits and fixes

Rounding out the FOs now. We’re down to the dregs, don’t worry, I’m almost done! Just in time for Craft Camp and hopefully some more FOs.

First, the fixes.

At the last craft camp I made a McCalls 6559 maxi dress. The not-maxi version, because that was the length I had fabric for. It came out a bit big – the pattern has SO much ease. At camp I had run the sides in, but the neckline and armscyes were too low by a good two inches, so I didn’t even bother finishing the edges. I figured it was a good muslin and maybe I’d wear it as a heatwave housedress.

Then a couple months after camp I was thinking about it and it occured to me… neck too low… armscye too low… maybe the SHOULDERS were too long? Like, duh. I took it up two inches and it was perfect. I finished the neck and arms with binding from an almost-but-not-quite-the-same piece of fabric. The fabric of the dress is really light, so instead of hemming it I attached a wider band of the same fabric I bound the neck in. That was a slight miscalculation, as it doesn’t sit right, but given that this fabric is thinnnnnn I don’t wear it out of the house except in heatwaves.

The thing about heatwaves, though, I don’t know if you’ve noticed, is that we’ve had quite a lot of them lately. I wore this dress almost every day I wasn’t working for a good two months. All that wear means it’s stretched out a bit – again, thin fabric, but that really just made it even better for those days where you think, if you let fabric touch your skin, you might actually melt.

I would definitely make this dress again, it was so easy – basically cut it out, sew the side seams and shoulders, finish the edges, done. And I love wearing it. Next time I would cut the neckline about an inch higher, though. Although I see in the photo that it’s pulling a bit under the shoulder, so maybe I’d only raise it 1.5″ and cut the neckline 1.3″ higher. Side seam-wise I would probably cut it to the first adjusted size, because it’s super easy to accommodate any stretching later by whipping in the side seams, and I don’t know that I’d want a skin-tight maxidress. I suspect maxidress season is over, although if I can work out sleeves for this I might make a winter weight one – I had a bought one that I LOVED that I friend called my ‘goddess dress’ but I wore it in winter and stood in front of a heater and, it being polyester, it melted. I still have it and I’ll probably just hem it shorter and wear it, but I’ve kept it to copy.

Next up are some pencil skirts I made at last year’s March Craft Camp. They are both Kasia, which I have made before. I added lined kick-pleats to them, but they stuck out.


Added to that, I sewed these both up on the overlocker, and didn’t use the whole seam allowance. So I had planned, at March Craft Camp, to undo them and bring them in, and add a lining, and fix the pleat. Janet even very kindly picked me up some stretch lining for them. But then that was the Craft Camp of the Great Pestilence, and I was too ill to concentrate on anything much, so they didn’t get fixed. They sat in the sewing room waiting for attention, and never got them.

So the other day I pulled them out again and tried them on. They… did not seem too big? Although I have actually lost some volume around my belly since I stopped eating gluten and am not bloated all the time, so who even knows what that’s about. I did nip in the black skirt’s waist by a centimetre or so. So I fixed the kickpleats and have been wearing them.

I fixed the pleats by topstitching the outside edge, pressing a lot, and sewing the pleat to the skirt at the top. In the case of the black skirt, the pleat was probably too big, so I brought the edges in as well. I just serged them off. It still sits a bit funny but is much improved. I tried to get some photos but they just look like… fabric. Nothing to see, really, but this paragraph can serve my own future reference. They do look much better.

Feb 001

 

I was going to crop this but I’m quite fond of pics whee you can see the random crap in people’s lives. This is my laundry. It is actually relatively tidy in this picture. It’s just that there is no storage to speak of in my house, it makes me crazy.

Anyway, excuse the crappy photo please, but you can see that it is much better. You can ALSO see the same waist/hemline problem I described last time. The waistline is about even (my shirt is covering it a bit at the front) but you can see the bottom of the yoke angles down, as does the hemline. The way I am standing in the photo above is my normal posture, it’s not particularly bad (for me) or anything. All my family have slight scoliosis and I have rounded shoulders and I just stick my butt out. That’s the way it is, no point making clothes pretending I’m going to ever stand up straight.

I… might have to start making yoked that are thinner at the front? I am really just kind of stumped, guys. Any suggestions welcome. I also think that yokes may be my answer to my circle skirt conundrums, maybe? I have worn those skirts again this week in the name of figuring out my options, and they are just… not COMFORTABLE. Which is a shame.

Anyhoodle, I also pulled out the zip in the black skirt and put in an invisible one, because you could see the tape in the old one, and I would have done the same for the red one but I didn’t have a red invisible zip. I have since bought one. I might swap them one day. I wore the red skirt today and it did actually bag out a bit so that it was a bit loose by the end of the day. I might whip in the side seams, although the extra room is really at the centre front yoke seams, but I am not changing them because it’s faced and everything’s overlocked and I can’t be bothered.

These would certainly benefit from a lining, they stick to everything and since I always wear shorts of leggings there is always something to stick to. But I am thinking of making bikeshorts out of the satin lining that Janet bought for me, instead.

So that’s the fixes.

The first knit is also a fix – and it isn’t even finished yet. It’s my Essential Cardigan, which I had finished up to the bands at September Craft Camp.

I actually finished the band in September, and started sewing it up. But because I had put so much work into the fitting process, I wanted to sew it properly. This is why I never do anything properly, guys, it is not finished yet. I sewed petersham ribbon onto the button bands because they pulled a bit, but then I had to hand sew the buttonholes by hand. My sewing machine can barely manage one ok-looking buttonhole on regular fabric, let alone several on a hand knit. I did about four before getting tired. Also it was hot and that wasn’t motivating me.

Also, once the bands were done and I tried it on, I was… a bit underwhelmed. It fits me well, but I am just not sure I did the shaping in the right place. I don’t know. I think it’s probably fine, except that I was expecting it to shoot glowing rainbows of unicorns, and obviously it didn’t. It only managed one shitty pegasus, you guys. So disappointing.

No, but really, the sleeves were also about an inch too long. I made the sleeves up myself because I wanted full-length, and I guess I overcompensated. That’s ok, they have cuffs so it’s easy enough to chop them off and regraft, and I also made them a bit thin so they could actually use being taken up like that. I might try to remember to bring this to craft camp and do that then.

I also cast on for Neon, in the flush of an almost-finished essential. Then when the Essential bogged down, so did Neon. It still looks pretty much like this:

and I am concerned that the red is too light for me and might make me look washed out. I’ve picked it up again this week and once I have sleeve holes I’ll try it on and see. The yarn is Bendigo Woolen Mills Luxury. I think I might need to go through my stash because there is a bunch of ‘fine but nothing special’ yarn and to be honest, I don’t want to knit it. I only want to knit special yarn. Really, I knit so slowly these days that I could put a whole year’s yarn budget towards one jumper. (Not that I have an actual dedicated yarn budget, but you know). But if the fine but nothing special yarn is in my stash, I feel like I have to knit it.

Well, that’s 1600 words about not very much, so that’s probably enough from me. The next two days are going to be crazy busy so I should really go PACK FOR CRAFT CAMP. Which is actually quite annoying at the moment because I am catsitting my cousin’s cat for a month. He’s in the spare/craft room, because he and my cat are both pretty territorial. So if I want to go into the craft room I have to either squeeze in without letting him out and my cat in, or else lock my cat in the bedroom. So I can’t pack both clothes and craft stuff at the same time. It’s very ‘don’t leave the fox with the chicken’ and frankly, I’m not enough of a lateral thinker for that kind of business.

Unblogged roundup

In preparing to reblog my latest FO I realised I’d left some knits unblogged. So this is a catchup post. I’ll list them from quickest knit to longest knit!

A very regal crown

I knit this at the June craft camp, for Princess Eleanor, to go with her stay in the Princess room. Many thanks to Jenny for the yarn and Caroline for the buttons.  It obviously knit up very quickly, and I think I might have to whip up a few for dressups for some small people I know.

I used 8ply instead of the 10ply the pattern called for, because that was what was to hand. I knit the largest size and it fits an adult head comfortably. Here it is on my bed head (I should note that I also have a large head, generally average sized hats are too small for me).

Tentacle scarf

https://i1.wp.com/images4.ravelrycache.com/uploads/Craftastrophies/167474600/uploadedImage_medium2.png
I look like a mad scientist!

I knit this for a far-away friend, because she posted something similar and I thought ‘I could knit that’. The original was crochet, but it’s not like this was difficult. I did write pattern notes but I’m not sure where they are, I’ll try to find them. I basically increased until it looked right, knit until I could wrap it around my neck long enough, and then decreased at the same rate. Then I worked the light green bits at the same increase rate, crocheted suckers on, and sewed it on.

Not the neatest sewing job – the darker yarn was a lot softer and the lighter a lot denser, so it was hard to match them. But it works. It actually got me out of a bit of a knitting slump, induced by spilling ink on the border of that sun blanket. So that was good! Then it sat for ages while I worked my way up to crocheting the suckers on. That took me FOREVER and I bitched about it a whole lot at craft camp. Sorry, everybody!


Colour Affection

I knit this for my best friend’s 30th. Which was in February. I didn’t cast it on until April. Whoops! The delay was because I was knitting the sun blanket for her, and then I had to wait till the yarn got here. The yarn is Malabrigo Sock, in Natural, Impressionist Sky and Cote D’Azure.

I had to rip back the start because the ends were too tight. I substituted a kfb for the suggested m1, which is what a lot of people’s Ravelry notes suggest (note to self, read the ravelry notes BEFORE casting on). But it’s still a bit tight. Another time I would do a yarn over and then twist it on the way back, I think. I couldn’t block it as heavily as I would have liked, because of the tightness, so the very beginning has a bit of a dome, which you can sort of see on my right shoulder, below.

I also pulled the yarn a bit tight as I was running it up the side of the short row section, so that bit is a bit tight. Oh, well. This took a while (four months of pretty consistent bus knitting) due to the volume of knitting, but it felt pretty fast.  Once it’s set up it’s excellent bus knitting, because the stripes mean you don’t have to count to know where you’re up to.

I really really love the pattern, but I’m a bit cross with the FO. Partly because of the tightness, and partly because the Cote D’Azure is not only a slightly different tone (it’s more purple than I thought it would be when I bought it) but it also ran when I blocked it, and stained some of the upper, white part. I wasn’t that upset because the white was also whiter than I had expected, so that toned it down a bit, but there were some splodges that I couldn’t get rid of.

It was still received with delight and the last time I saw it it showed signs of constant wear – it’s holding up well, however. Absolutely the best reception for that kind of gift.

Knitting

I’ve been knitting this cardigan, Ravelry tells me, since December 2011. It got swallowed by my knitting slump.

In my mind I had ages to go of knitting the body. I picked it up after craft camp and started knitting, and then tried it on and it was just about perfect. The sleeves went pretty quick and even though it felt like the front band took forever, it was pretty fast too.

It’s 5ply, but on reasonably large needles – 4mm – so it does knit pretty quick. It also only took a ball and a half of Bendigo yarn, so about 1200m. I was going to knit the sleeves longer but they looked good short when I tried it on. Besides, this is intended to be my office jumper, for just chucking on on top of stuff. So shorter sleeves are good. I was worried they were a bit tight – I know the pattern was adjusted to make them smaller, since people had found them too big. I guess they didn’t account for those of us with bingo wings. They did ease out with blocking, but you can still see the lumps in them from my tshirt and all of that. I should have picked up just a few extra stitches under the arm. In fact, I did pick them up, to avoid holes, but then decreased to have the number required by the pattern.

I really like it, and I was thinking about knitting another one in another colour but I don’t think I need more than one open-front cardi. Or if I do I’d like it to come closer to being closed, rather than hanging open. Because I have more… landscape… out the front than many, there’s more left exposed. But I couldn’t make the front much bigger or else the collar at the back would have stuck up too far. It’s totally fine, it doesn’t bother me at all, but I don’t need another like it. It’s perfect for indoors only, or a night time cardi for summer or spring, but I wouldn’t wear it TO work in winter. Only AT work.

All in all, I’m very pleased! Rav link here with all the deets.

I also spent pretty much one whole day of the Easter long weekend sorting through my stash and putting it up on Ravelry. Which was a bit of a shock, to be honest. I mean, obviously I knew how much yarn I had in terms of where it was stored but I didn’t realise, somehow, HOW MUCH YARN I have. And a lot of it is either single skeins of sock or lace weight, which I don’t knit much of, or it’s bendigo yarn which is ok but it’s nothing special. And a lot of it is exactly the same colour that I knit this featherweight in. Due to an ordering mishap (they sent the wrong weight and said just to keep it since it wasn’t worth posting back) I have a jumper’s worth of 8ply and another jumper’s worth of 5ply. Which is fine because it’s obviously My Colour but I don’t need all the jumpers out of it.

So I’m going to try to knit through some of my stash. I did chuck some of the older, crappier stash, and I’m posting some stuff off to a raveller tomorrow, which has freed up a WHOLE DRAWER. I also sorted out my queue so that everything on the first page is something I’m dying to knit and to own. There was a lot of stuff on there that I’d enjoy knitting but is not my style, so I got realistic about it. I need more plain knits with a little bit of interest, since that is what I like wearing. And what I like knitting, thankfully. I like me a good swathe of stocking stitch.

I’ve already cast on and Essential Cardigan with the leftovers from my Emily. I’m not going to have enough, just from the leftovers, so I’ve decided to frog Emily. I feel sad about that but realistically, I’m not going to wear that jumper. I like the neckline a lot, but the sleeves are not really my style, and the fix in the body is too obvious. So, it goes. I have a couple of other knits that I need to either fix (my Rogue, significantly, which has too-short sleeves and body) or just get rid of altogether. There’s no point having them taking up space when I never wear them, and I’m a much better knitter than I was when I made a lot of them, so I feel confident in being able to either fix them or at least evaluate what is wrong about them and chalk them up to learning. So those are my vague knitting goals for this year – knit from stash and fix my knits.

Sewjourn

I wrote the draft for this right after I got back from camp. I didn’t publish it because I needed to hem and photograph some stuff. Obviously it took me until the Easter long weekend to get around to that. Whoops. So please excuse the jumping back and forth between then and now, if I try to make it more consistent I’ll procrastinate and then it’s never going to get published. Please also excuse angry face. I just cannot work the self timer AND manage a facial expression at the same time.

Like a bee on a cactus flower

I got back from another craft camp on Monday evening. It’s Thursday morning and it already feels so far away, like a dream. I think it was my favourite camp yet. Not the most exciting or thrilling but the one that I have most constantly, solidly enjoyed. And probably my most productive. Not the one with the biggest highs from that feeling where you make a new friend or cross some border of intimacy. But more comfortable and sweet in that way where you don’t have to think about it because spending time with these people is just so easy and as effort-free as being in a space with other people will ever be, for an introvert. And the food, oh my lord.

I don’t know that I have much to say about it. It was just really really lovely. I continue to be so grateful for these people and these pauses in my year. Chances to reflect and take time and really get into the making. Such a refreshing thing. This weekend I flew in on Monday and out on Friday so I had most of those days as well as the whole day on Saturday and Sunday, and it was just blissful. I need to figure out ways to make my normal life just a little bit more like camp.

It was also the camp where I went through the most thread. I think I sewed almost every seam in every garment twice, and I came home with a couple of things unhemmed because I was out of matching thread.

I flew in with a suitcase that was 100g over the weight limit. Then I bought stuff at the op shop. With some rearranging of my carry-on I managed to fly home with a suitcase that was only 200g over. Phew.

Here are the things that I made:

A Tiramisu dress, which will get its own post shortly.

I also half-made a blank canvas tee out of this same fabric.

I will discuss the fabric in further detail when I post about my Tira, but basically, it’s a bastard. It’s super stretchy with not much recovery. So the shirt is fine, if a bit… fine (read: nipply) but the binding was droopy. I was going to redo it but I ended up just folding it under and zig zag stitching it. I think this will just be an around the house shirt, sadly, and I won’t bother hemming it. But as a wearable muslin I’d call it very successful.

Another one of those Ottobre skirts that I like to churn out. This one in camel coloured sateen from Spotters. Crinkly stuff, curse it. I did back pockets on this one which turned out a bit dodgy but oh well. I neglected this one in my photoshoot so this is the only photo of it. If I can find some camel-coloured drill I might remake it in that, but all the brownish stuff I could find was muddyish colours which I didn’t like.

A red Kasia.I wear my blue Kasia all the time because it’s comfy and simple but not boring and also it has pockets.

The spots in the pockets are a Robert Kauffman quilting cotton that I bought ages ago for a project that I now cannot remember anything about. You need so little of the contrast fabric for this, it’s great. The main fabric is stretch drill from Spotters.

The last time I made Kasia I graded it up and then ended up taking out all the extra width. This time I just cut out the biggest size, which was then too small so I spent ages taking it apart and putting side panels in, and then it was too big. So I took the panels out and sewed it with just a 1cm seam allowance and it’s perfect. It was initially a teeny bit tight on the hips but it’s stretched out enough that it’s just spot on. I omitted the front fly shenanigans, and put in a back zip, as well as borrowing a pattern piece from a Lisette pattern that Sue had brought, and making a little kick pleat at the back.

It sticks out some, but oh well. It makes the skirt much more functional. Another time I would make the whole pleat from a thinner fabric, which would also give it a seam to fold along. I hemmed the red one a bit shorter at the pleat than the rest of the skirt, and it sits flatter vertically, because of that. As in, the pleat doesn’t stick out the bottom of the hem, although it does stick out horizontally still.

I wish I’d remembered to take out the pouchy bit at the back, though – the pocket panels are mirrored on the back and it’s puffy in the thick drill. I should have made the facings out of a lighter fabric, too, cos it’s bulky. But it’s perfectly wearable and I love it. I brought it home unhemmed because I ran out of thread. I also wish I’d done an invisible zip – it is actually an invisible zip, but I don’t have an invisible zip foot at camp so I just set it in like a normal zip. Oh, well.

Another Kasia, in black stretch drill, also from spotlight. Back zip for this one too and no pockets, I couldn’t be bothered mucking around and I just need something real simple to be a wardrobe standard. I just laid the pocket pattern pieces on top and cut it out like one piece, nothing complicated. I used a scrap from Jenny’s intimidating pile to make a sneaky kick pleat, though. (Which sticks out, too. Sigh.)

I might need another black pencil skirt with more interesting pockets. This one probably took me 2 hours ish, without hemming. When I did hem it this weekend I just sewed with a straight stitch because clearly I wasn’t getting around to the blind hem that I had intended, and I couldn’t find my blind hem foot anyways, or figure out how to deal with the kick pleat when blind hemming. So that took me all of ten minutes, plus I had to re-top-stitch the yoke because the poplin I’d lined it with isn’t as stretchy as the drill and it had gotten all wonky when I sewed it the first time, and I had puckers.

And I finished my blanket! Which has been to several craft camps now. I blogged the finished product here.

Such a lovely time. Thank you all for your company, and your food, and your stories.

Sunbreak

I finished Sunbreak.

Ravelry tells me that I started it on July 19, 2011. I remember starting it at a Craft Camp. I used one of Kate‘s stitch markers for the centre and ended up taking it home with me. I returned it on the next camp, don’t worry. I think I finished the centre bit that camp, because I remember frantically making up little bobbins to do the rays, as everyone was packing up to leave.

For a while after that it looked like this

I couldn’t really knit it on public transport, so I watched a lot of Qi and That Mitchell and Webb Look while knitting this part of it. This part was sometimes hair-pullingly complex, but I can genuinely say (at this remove) that it was fun. I would do it again, no matter how lacking in calm wisdom I sound in this other post.

The reason it was so tangly was that I didn’t want a lot of floats behind the rays. Because the yarn is crepe ply, not wooly, they showed through and it was hard to keep them neat. So I basically did intarsia. Each little section of colour was its own bobbin. I remember getting very frustrated at how lumpy and imperfect it was looking, but I decided that a bit of bumpiness was ok. Eventually I got to the end of the short rays and it did get a lot easier then.

And then you knit each corner to square off the shape. It’s been long enough that I can’t remember the details of this, but I remember thinking that it was very elegantly designed. I remember a few head scratching moments of confusion, but I trusted in the pattern and it worked out lovely.

Then you block the middle bit like lace. It’s knit on fairly large needles, so it spreads out a lot. I didn’t get exactly the recommended size, so I just blocked it till it was even, and a nice proportion.

The centre is 76cm x 110cm. Flickr tells me that I blocked it in early February 2012. I started knitting the border, although after a whole blanket I wasn’t super excited about that. I decided to knit the longest sides first.

Then, on March 30, disaster struck. I know it was then because that’s the date of the email from me to the Clean Person at the hairpin, saying ‘HALP! I have ink on my knitting!’ A pen leaked on my bag and there was a splodge of ink, right at the beginning of the longest border edge that I’d almost finished. Clean Person Jolie was very helpful but although the ink was reduced, it was still present and I knew it would always bother me. So I ripped it out.

Then I didn’t knit anything at all for almost a year. I picked it up again in January this year. Because a summer of repeated 40 degree heatwaves is clearly the best time to knit. But also, I started it when I found out that my best friend was pregnant. It’s not for her kid, it’s for her. But he’s about to turn one and I thought it would be nice to have it for her by then. Not to mention that I intended to knit something for her 30th which was in February but obviously I am working on a year’s delay here.

So anyway. I turned up to craft camp this time with the blanket, two long edges, and half of a short edge. I finished the first short edge that first Friday there, and sewed on everything I had, so I only had one short edge to go. I was DETERMINED to finish it.

On the Sunday night I had the edge about five rows from completion when I gave up and went to bed. On Monday morning I steam blocked it and sewed it on. And then we had a little photoshoot.

I am SO pleased with it. I love it. The border gives it a nice heft, and it’s as snuggly as you could not-want in the heat we’ve been having. I am so pleased to finally be finished, and I’m really pleased with it as a piece of work, and proud of my own skill.

With the border it is 93cm x 120cm. I lost track of the amount of yarn I used, because of the shenanigans with the bobbins, but it weighs just over 900g, so I’d say I used 4 and a bit balls of blue (Bendigo Woollen Mills Classic in Tasman), and maybe a quarter of a ball of the yellow, which is an unknown yellow in Classic that I bought at their mill. Which is a shame because it’s a lovely colour, unlike all the standard yellows they offer which are palid and sad.

I’ll be giving it to its owner this evening and I hope she likes it.

Ravelry link.